Friday, January 17, 2014

Pork Tenderloin Paprikash


We eat a fair amount of pork tenderloin because it is relatively low in fat, easy to prepare, and tastes delicious. We are always looking for new recipes. We have grilled it, sauteed medallions, and made stir fry with it, but never made Pork Tenderloin Paprikash, until now. We were having company, and saw this recipe in Cooking Light, and thought that we would try it.

 
Paprikash, according to Wikipedia, is Hungarian Stew made with Chicken or Veal, or in this case, Pork cooked with green peppers, onions,  garlic, tomato paste, flour, chicken stock, paprika, spicy or sweet, thyme, wine, vinegar, and sour cream.  We used the Spicy or Hot Paprika, which adds a lot of spice, and an orangey color. This dish has so much flavor, with all of the vegetables, the spicy paprika, and tender chunks of pork, served over egg noodles.  We used the No Yolk Noodles.  If you don't like a lot of spice, you can use the sweet paprika.


First, you cut the tenderloin in 1" chunks, and then saute them until brown on all sides.  Remove the pork from the pan, and set aside.  Then you saute the onion, bell pepper, and garlic, until the vegetables are tender.  Add in flour, tomato paste, and thyme, and paprika. Saute 1 minute until combined.   Add wine and de-glaze the pan. Add Stock and vinegar.  Bring to a boil, and  add pork back in to the pan.  Reduce heat, and simmer until pork is tender, about 5 minutes.  Stir in sour cream, and do no boil.  Serve over noodles.  There it is, a flavorful dish, full of tender pork on a bed of tender noodles.  I believe that there are many versions of this classic Hungarian dish, and this is a lighter version.  Paprikash is usually made with chicken, so maybe next time we might try the chicken, but the pork was very good.




Pork Paprikash with Egg Noodles from Cooking Light
  • 6 ounces uncooked egg noodles We used No Yolk Noodles
  • 1 (1-pound) pork tenderloin, trimmed and cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt, divided
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, divided
  • 5 teaspoons olive oil, divided
  • 1 1/2 cups chopped onion
  • 1 cup chopped green bell pepper
  • 2 teaspoons chopped garlic
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme
  • 1 teaspoon hot paprika
  • 1/2 cup dry white wine
  • 1 cup unsalted chicken stock
  • 1 tablespoon cider vinegar
  • 3 tablespoons reduced-fat sour cream
Directions:
 1. Cook noodles according to package directions, omitting salt and fat; drain.

2. Sprinkle pork with 1/4 teaspoon salt and 1/4 teaspoon black pepper. Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add 2 teaspoons oil; swirl to coat. Add pork; cook 4 minutes, browning on all sides. Remove pork from pan. Reduce heat to medium. Add remaining 1 tablespoon oil to pan; swirl to coat. Add onion, bell pepper, garlic, remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt, and remaining 1/4 teaspoon black pepper; Sauté 4 minutes or until vegetables are tender. Add flour, tomato paste, thyme, and paprika; Sauté 30 seconds. Add wine; cook 1 minute, scraping pan to loosen browned bits. Add stock and vinegar; bring to a boil. Add pork; reduce heat, and simmer 5 minutes or until pork is tender. Remove pan from heat; stir in sour cream. Serve over noodles.

l linked up my recipe to Brandie@The Country Cook's Weekend Potluck #101
 Stop by and say Hi to Brandie


 
 

8 comments:

  1. i love paprikash, what a wonderful adaptation! thanks for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sarah,
      You are so welcome. We loved this recipe, and it's good for leftovers, too.

      Delete
  2. Becky, you are now an official Hungarian cook...you have perfected the paprikash dish. Everything that is mentioned about the paprikash is totally correct. It truly is a company dish, and I can only imagine how tender the pork tenderloin was. Beautiful presentation, and I must say it's even prettier than the one they featured on Cooking Light! Have a wonderful weekend...stay warm; you guys in Chicago really had your share of the brutal winter!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Elisabeth,
    I am so honored to be deemed an official Hungarian Cook, especially coming from you. I was really afraid of what you would think of this dish. Thank you for your sweet comments,

    Yes, we had our share of winter with more snow coming tonight and tomorrow. We've had enough snow already.

    ReplyDelete
  4. That sounds delicious! Great job and great recipe. Be sure to stop by my link party today, #OmNomNomFriday, and share some of your fantastic creations. Have a great weekend :)

    Happy Blogging!
    Happy Valley Chow

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Eric,
      Thank you! I did stop by your linky party and joined in! A great event!

      Delete
  5. To try pork paprikash was on my mind for a while and then..I lost the recipe ! :) thanks for sharing it, I will try yours :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Medeja,
      If your try this one, let me know how you like it.

      Delete

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